Content
Event Booking
Web Links
Contacts
Tags
Categories
News Feeds
Search - K2

Guest Sculptor

Flight of the Stone Fountain

An interview with Woody Morris regarding his Pennsylvania bluestone fountain project for a Capitol Hill condominium complex.The finished fountain: with the beautiful look of natural stone and the soothing sounds of water.

Woody cutting a slot in the bluestone for the water weir.Q. Hi, Woody. We understand you are a stone sculptor as well as CEO of Waterscapes LLC. Which came first?
A. I started building water features in 1995 when I was in charge of Aqua Quips in-ground swimming pool division. We built custom liner swimming pools. A couple of our projects were Street of Dreams (which won a gold award from National Pool and Spa International) and an indoor swimming pool for Dale Chihuly. I formed Waterscapes LLC in 1997.


Q. When did you get into stone sculpture?

A. A good friend of mine, Richard Hestekind, talked me into attending a stone-carving symposium held at Camp Brotherhood in Mt. Vernon, in 2000. I spent 9 days there and was hooked. So when I’m not working with water features, I’m carving.

Q. What does Waterscapes specialize in?
A. We specialize in custom designed and built water features for indoor and outdoor installations. Most of our installations are waterfalls, streams, Koi ponds, indoor and outdoor stone, metal and glass waterwalls.All packed up with someplace to go.

Q. You recently did a large stone water feature for a condominium project in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle. How did you get that project?
A. I was contacted by Mill Creek Residential Construction Corporation. They had heard of me by word of mouth.
Q. How did you decide what rock to use?
A. Their landscape designer met me at Marenakos Rock Center in Issaquah, Washington. We spent a few hours searching the entire facility for the perfect stones. We chose two Pennsylvania Bluestone slabs. One measured 3’ x 12” x 6’ and weighed about 1000 pounds. The other stone measured 5’ x 12” x 4’ and weighed about 1100 pounds.

Q. Where did you fabricate the stones?
A. We took them to our Studio located on Whidbey Island.

Q. How big is your studio?
A. We have a 7000 sq. foot studio shared by12 artists… FreelandArtStudios.com.

It’s a 45 second flight up and over the top.Q. What did you have to do to the stones before you took them back and installed them in Seattle?
A. I set them up as they would be installed and took exact measurements for the two waterfall weirs. After they were measured and marked I used a diamond water-fed gas-powered hand held chain saw to plunge cut the slots through the stones. I ground out the back of each stone to hold the lighted weir mechanisms. Once that was completed I used a torch to flame the surface of the stones to remove marks or flaws. When this process was complete I test-fit the weirs with running water.


Q. How did the install go?

A. We transported the two stones to the project site on the corner of 11th and E. Pike St. about a mile east of the Pike Place Market. There was a very large building crane on site for lifting the stones up and over the nine-story building and lowering them down into the ground floor central courtyard. We arrived on site with the trailer, parked in front of the building and the rigger hooked up the first stone and off it went. It took about 45 seconds in flight and over the building. Then the next. I wish all installs were that easy. Once the stones were over the building they were set in place in a concrete basin.That’s Woody on the left directing the installation.

Q. How were they secured?

A. The stones were bolted into the concrete.

Q. How was the plumbing completed?

A. We used a Filtrific storage tank, containing the pump, overflow and automatic fill. 

Q. How do the waterfall weirs work?

A. Each 24” wide weir has a 1/8” slot that the water flows through creating the waterfall. In addition, there are colored LED lights that color the water from the inside to create a fantastic light show at night.

Q. How is the water kept clean?

A. We installed a large in-line UV light. We check the UV light occasionally and drain and clean the water feature once a year.

SNW. Congratulations, Woody, on the design, making and installation of this calming and peaceful water feature smack dab in the middle of the Seattle scene. And thanks for sharing it with all of us who love stone.
Woody Morris: You bet. Happy to do it.

Verena Schwippert Award

photo of Verena Schwippert taken by Maralyne Powell
VERENA SCHWIPPERT NAMED 3-D ARTIST OF THE YEAR
BY SNOHOMISH COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL


Verena was born in Bergkamen, Westphalia, Germany and completed her education in Germany with her B.F.A. degree in Art Education at the University of Hamburg in l973.

After moving to Seattle in l974, she spent a few years living and working in various places as far apart as Barrow, Alaska and Taos, New Mexico.

In l995 Verena settled into her current home in Arlington, Washington, having joined NWSSA two years earlier to become part of our generous and enthusiastic family. She has subsequently served on the NWSSA Board for many years and also has been part of the Snohomish County Arts Commission for 5 years.

Read more ...

The Animals of Pippa Unwin

THE ANIMALS OF PIPPA UNWIN Polar Bear, Portland Roach Stone by Pippa Unwin

The fact that she loves animals is reflected in her work. It is also evident when looking at her web page at www.mewstonemasonry.com. This address as chosen not only because her husband lived near the little rocky island off Plymouth known as the Mewstone, but because it also contains the word Mew, the English onomatopoeia for the cat’s meow.

Read more ...

Small Town Sculpture Success

by Stuart Jacobson MJ Anderson  

Sculptures have become integral and an important part of Historic Downtown McMinnville, Oregon.  They are valued by the people who live here, and also they are increasingly recognized as an additional tourist draw.  McMinnville was recently named as having one of the best main streets in the US by Parade Magazine. It is in the heart of Oregon’s premier wine growing region in the Willamette Valley, and tourism has become an increasingly important driver of our local economy.

Read more ...

Al Sieradski’s Talk at the Jacobs Gallery

Al Sieradski’s Talk at the Jacobs Gallery Rhythm Opening Curve In Time, Al Sieradski Italian Portoro Marble with Brass and granite Base

To family and friends here, I offer my thanks for supporting my carving habit. From the rest of you, I ask for a couple of minutes to explain my works in this Rhythm exhibit.

I have just three points I want to make: a What, a Why and a How.

What: What is this stuff? Well, stones! Their main feature is that they endure; each records a slice of the history of the earth. The pieces of alabaster, marble, onyx, and calcite here have their own unique stories, too long-winded to detail now. The quick point is that stone sculpture offers art that is 50 million to over a billion years in the making.

Read more ...

Kazutaka Uchida: Life as an Artist

KAZUTAKA UCHIDA: Life As An Artist

Uchida in studio

By Kentaro Kojima

Kazutaka Uchida's first catalyst for becoming a sculptor came fifty or so years ago. While walking through Auguste Rodin's exhibition in the National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, he came upon a piece called "La Pensee." The piece was a pure white marble and depicted the portrait of Camille Claudel on top of the rough textured block. This piece, to the young Uchida, fifteen at the time, was shocking and he sensed a scent of Europe in it. Little did he know that seven years later he would be moving to Paris to study art and would be showing at the Rodin museum with Rene Collamarini and his students.

Kazutaka Uchida was born in 1948 in Toyota City, Aich, Japan. His father was an engineer that designed military airplanes during the war. He told the young Kazutaka to work on things that would not hurt others.

Read more ...