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Richard Beyer Remembered

Richard Beyer

Richard Beyer

by George Pratt
George Pratt’s recently rediscovered photo of Richard Beyer making his selections from a huge pile of quarried granite blocksOne morning I looked up from hammering at the Terry Fox sculpture to see this stranger standing quietly on the top of that huge pile of granite quarry blocks adjacent to my studio yard. True, my yard was located in an area of Vancouver where bad guys were eternally cruising to see what they could score, but making off with an eight-ton granite block seemed unlikely. Yet he stood there, still and thoughtful, for almost half an hour, as if he was wondering how he could put one of those beautiful, fresh blocks in his pocket and take it home. I was busting to find out what he was all about, but before going over to accost him, I seized the moment to take this dramatic photo which has sat forgotten here in my shoe-box for thirty-seven years. (Where did those years all go!?)


In the end, he did acquire three of those blocks and transported them off to Fremont (I’d never heard of the place) where he set to hammering at them just as I was doing with my block (it was once part of that pile) although his was a different subject.

Richard Beyer carved a lot of stone, but he is better known for his cast metal work. This one, “Waiting for the Interurban”, is his 1978 cast aluminum installation in the Fremont neighborhood of Seattle.


For this man was Rich Beyer and his project was to carve out a small herd of farm animals, sheep mainly, for the University of Western Washington. Thus began a fast friendship with this remarkable, affable man, who, along with Meg Pettibone, sparked the creation of the Northwest Stone Sculptors Association. Old time members will all have their stories about him for, if anything, he was not forgettable. May he rest in peace.  “The Man Who Used to Hunt Cougars For Bounty”, 1972, Granite, Carved for The University of Western Washington.

Elaine Mackay; More than a Tenth

Elaine Mackay

Elaine Mackay


The NorthWest Stone Sculptors Association was saddened to hear of Elaine Mackay's recent passing in January 2017. In memory of her, we share the following articles, photos, video and your remembrances of Elaine and how she touched so many of us.
Elaine Mackay 2000 Sculpture NorthWest cover
In her own words:
"Carving stone has given me personal happiness, satisfaction and an even keel in my life that had heretofore eluded me. Which brings me to the importance of NWSSA in my life. The community of like-minded people, ideas, education, and opportunity. Reading David Quammen’s article on the Dodo bird coincided with my first Camp B. symposium and I knew I would never have to face such a destiny. This is what my art and the people I absorb through NWSSA gave me. I hope I am able to give a tenth back."
- Elaine MacKay

Elaine touched so many of our lives. Upon hearing of her passing, many memories were shared on the listserve.  The following are just a few remembrances from our members.  If you have a memory or photo of Elaine, please share it with us. {This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.}

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Sheri Tangen

Sheri Tangen

Sheri Tangen 2017 Suttle Lake Symposium
The NorthWest Stone Sculptors Association was saddened to hear of the passing of Sheri Tangen on December 2nd 2018. In memory of her, her family shared the following in remembrance of Sheri.
Sheri Tangen at Suttle Lake in 2017

Sheri was born in 1954 in North Seattle to Harry and Elin Tangen. She grew up in Richmond Beach in a house that her parents built. She had an older sister, Julie, and 2 younger brothers, Bryan and Erik. Her father was a fisherman, and her mother was a homemaker. In addition to the children, her mother raised poodles and German shepherds. They enjoyed growing up there and playing at the nearby beach. Sheri loved animals of all kinds and was known to bring home strays that crossed her path.

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Nancy Green

Nancy Green

Nancy Green
Nancy Green was a teacher, mother, artist, and student of Everett DuPen. Nancy joined NWSSA in 1992 and served as a membership chair. Above is a picture of Nancy sketching the field during a Camp Brotherhood Symposium - notice the sculpture walk set-up in the foreground and the barn in the background.

Nancy was featured in our July 1997 issue of Sculpture Northwest - Artist Spotlight: Nancy Green